PHILOSOPHY 167       CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY   SPRING, 2005
Professor: Richard Arneson
 

INTRODUCTORY HANDOUT
[Click on blue above.]
This handout contains information you will need to know about the course including course requirements and the schedule of lecture/discussion topics and required readings for each class meeting.  The information on this handout is NOT duplicated below.

FURTHER WEEK-BY-WEEK INFORMATION

Week 1.
FRI: Guest lecturer. Mr. Kory Schaff.  Handout: John Rawls's theory of justice: Chapters 1 and 2 introduced

Week 2.
WED:  Handout on The Original Position.
FRI: NO CLASS.  This class has been rescheduled for Thursday, April 14, 8-9 p.m., place to be announced.

Week 3.
MON:  Handout: Notes on Rawls, chapter 5, distributive shares.
THUR: MAKEUP LECTURE 8-9 p.m.  Makeup Lecture: Notes on Rawls, chapter 4, Liberty.

Week 4.
MON: Reading: G. A. Cohen, "Where the Action Is: On the Site of Distributive Justice."
Alternative link to this essay: Click on blue.

WEEK 5.
MON:  Handout: Nozick on Distribution, Chapter 7 notes.
FRI: Reading: Amartya Sen, "Rights and Agency," sections 1-4 only.  Handout: Nozick versus Sen on Rights.
Alternative link to this Sen essay: Click on blue.

Week 6.
MON: MIDTERM TAKE-HOME EXAMClick on blue.
MON: Recommended reading: R. Arneson, "The Shape of Lockean Rights: Fairness, Pareto, Moderation, and Constraint."
WED: Reading: A. John Simmons, "The Principle of Fair Play."
Alternative link to this essay: Click on blue.
WED AND FRI: Guest Lecturer.  Professor David Brink. Lecture notes on Fair Play.

Week 7.
MON: Recommended reading: Richard Arneson, "Welfare Should Be the Currency of Justice."
WED:  MIDTERM TAKE-HOME EXAM DUE IN CLASS.
FRI:   WRITING ASSIGNMENT (DUE WEDNESDAY OF WEEK 10).  Click on blue.

Week 8.
FRI: Reading: Elizabeth Anderson, "What Is the Point of Equality."  Alternative link to this essay: Click on blue.
Recommended reading: Richard Arneson, "Cracked Foundations of Liberal Equality"; also Arneson, "Luck Egalitarianism and Priority."
Recommended reading: Samuel Scheffler, "Choice, Circumstance, and the Value of Equality."
FRI: Lecture Notes on Ronald Dworkin.  Click on blue.

Week 9.
 

Week 10.
MON:  NO CLASS.  HOLIDAY.
WED: WRITING ASSIGNMENT DUE IN CLASS.  Handout: Notes on Democracy. Click on blue.
FRI:  Handout: Advance information on final exam.  Click on blue.  Handout: Notes on Secession. Click on blue.

FINAL EXAMINATION.  The final examination for this course will take place on Monday, June 6 from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

The final exam counts for 40 per cent of your course grade.  (If you are enrolled on a Pass/Not Pass basis, see the note on the final exma in the Introductory Handout.)  No use of books or notes will be permitted at any time during the exam.

The first 90 minutes of the exam will consist of short answer questions testing comprehension of required course materials (required readings, lectures, handouts). You will have some choice as to which questions to answer.  To examine the final exam short answer
questions for 2000, click on blue.  For the final exam short answer questions for 2001, click on blue.  For the final exam short answer questions for 2003, click on blue.

The remaining 90 minutes of the exam will consist of essay questions handed out at the last class, Friday, June 3.  About seven essay questions will be handed out, and about four of these will appear on the final exam, and you will then be asked to write essays on two of these four topics posed.